To Mark Or Not To Mark (My Contrarian Bible-Marking Philosophy)

James Randal:

Weylan Deaver makes strong arguments against marking up your Bible.

Originally posted on Biblical Notes:

By Weylan Deaver

You might think a preacher marks up his Bible more than anyone else with highlights, underlining, references, definitions, etc. I used to be of that mindset. I thought it ideal, for example, if I were teaching a class on Matthew, if I could just open my Bible and have all my study notes in microscopic print in the margin. That way, no additional notes or notebook would be necessary to teach the class; I could carry my Bible and nothing more (how marvelously simple!). Over time, my Bible-marking ways evolved into anti-marking. I didn’t just decide to mark less in my Bible; I ceased it altogether (writing on the blank pages in back of the Bible doesn’t count). You may feel free to differ. But, here is my reasoning.

First, margin notes are not easily transferred. Any continuously used Bible will wear out and, no matter how…

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Guest Editorial: The Single Minister

James Randal:

Stan Mitchell gives churches the what-for.

Originally posted on Richard Mansel:

young-preacher

[Editor's Note: About 20 years ago at one of my first try-outs as a graduate of the Master of Ministry program at Freed-Hardeman University, I was told that a congregation would hire me if I were married. You don't forget such moments and ever since then, I have been an advocate for men who are single being allowed into the ministry. Stan Mitchell does an excellent job arguing for that very thing. Please take notice of his message.]

by Stan Mitchell

“For a man to remain a bachelor, he must either keep a cool head, or cold feet.”

Barnabas, Jeremiah, Paul, Jesus Christ. What do these men have in common? They were single ministers. Bachelors who served the Lord.

It fascinates me how resistant the church is today to the idea of a single man in the ministry. I don’t know how many church members say, “We prefer our preacher…

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‘Defense Series’ tackles hard questions like ‘only ones going to heaven’

In his Defense Series on doctrinal and moral issues, Kentucky preacher Ben Giselbach addresses tough issues on his blog Plain Simple Faith.

His latest and robust article answers the question asked often in the southern US where the church is fairly well known: “Do You Think You’re The Only Ones Going To Heaven?

This question appeals to the emotions. You can certainly understand how angry it would make anyone feel if a group decided they alone were going to heaven. Such a claim would seem arrogant and pretentious. I’ve never heard a member of the church of Christ make a statement like this. But if one ever has, shame on him. Members of churches of Christ are not the only ones who deal with this question. Muslims ask Christians. Protestants ask Catholics. Christians ask Mormons and Jehovah’s Witnesses. And everyone asks Jews. In our age of pluralism, religious groups are quick to demonize any other group that makes a claim to know truth. So suppose you are asked, “Are members of the church of Christ the only ones going to heaven?” How would you answer?

It’s another good read.

 

Preacher reboots on Facebook

Tennessee preacher Adam Faughn tells about his fascinating experience with Facebook.

I have been thinking about Facebook a lot lately, and I took a very odd series of steps over the past few days. To make a long story short, I have completely started over on Facebook.

If you are still interested, let me give you the longer story.

- See more at: http://www.faughnfamily.com/restarted-facebook/?utm_content=buffere44d5&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer#sthash.is3U5ruS.dpuf

I have been thinking about Facebook a lot lately, and I took a very odd series of steps over the past few days. To make a long story short, I have completely started over on Facebook.

If you are still interested, let me give you the longer story.

- See more at: http://www.faughnfamily.com/restarted-facebook/?utm_content=buffere44d5&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer#sthash.is3U5ruS.dpuf

I have been thinking about Facebook a lot lately, and I took a very odd series of steps over the past few days. To make a long story short, I have completely started over on Facebook.

If you are still interested, let me give you the longer story.

Read here why and how Adam did this.

I have been thinking about Facebook a lot lately, and I took a very odd series of steps over the past few days. To make a long story short, I have completely started over on Facebook.

If you are still interested, let me give you the longer story.

- See more at: http://www.faughnfamily.com/restarted-facebook/?utm_content=buffere44d5&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer#sthash.is3U5ruS.dpuf

I have been thinking about Facebook a lot lately, and I took a very odd series of steps over the past few days. To make a long story short, I have completely started over on Facebook.

If you are still interested, let me give you the longer story.

- See more at: http://www.faughnfamily.com/restarted-facebook/?utm_content=buffere44d5&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer#sthash.is3U5ruS.dpuf

5 ways to love others

After showing the importance of the second great commandment of Christ, and things that hurt others, Butch Adams gives five practical ways to love our neighbor.

Here’s the Problem:

One of our goals is supposed to be to get people to heaven – to give them the same hope we have.

Collectively, we might need to do a better job at that. We will not win many people over for Christ being less than loving. A less than loving Christian, is not Christian at all.

Once we put ourselves out there, everyone is watching. They are going to make a judgment about our sincerity.

What might you add to his list?

They say ‘literally.’ I still say ‘really.’ But not ‘very.’

Originally posted on The Fellowship Room:

volcano Today’s young people are using the word “literally” as an intensifier, standing the sense of the word on its head. “I was literally scared to death.” Well, literally they weren’t or they wouldn’t still be here to make such a vapid comment. It’s a space filler, and a bad one at that, for people who prefer not to put their minds to work, but whose mouths didn’t get the message. Worse, it’s an adverb, which proliferates worse than the proverbial rabbit or guppy. Writers are told that adverbs are the enemy.

I much prefer the intensifier “really.” I used it so much in college, apparently, that Don or Ron Williams (same dorm, same class) made it part of my name, since both begin with the letter r. (Speaking of whom, I saw them the for the first time since college last year at Polishing the Pulpit.) I use it…

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Mother Has Gone Home

James Randal:

Glenda Williams tells about caring for her aged mother and watching her pass into the next life.

Originally posted on The Fellowship Room:

Eulala Williams 100th for Fellowship RoomIt is hard for me not to have death, departure, and the other side on my mind these days, and rightfully so, after just losing my mother whom I had cared for full-time for over six years. She had lived in our home over ten years. We were always close, but those precious years made us grow even closer. A few years ago I started journaling things mother said and did and shared them on Facebook, a social media on the Internet. People fell in love with mother and looked forward to reading the almost daily posts. Now they write to tell me how much they miss reading them.

In my thoughts about death, departure, and the other side, I think about the thoughts we have when a person dies. There may be rejoicing because “the old coot is finally gone and out-of-the-way,” or because they are “out of their…

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